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Sometimes you gotta stop

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I've been going over my book a lot. It is after all my first Crime Thriller. I wrote a new beginning, showing our hero doing normal world stuff, added a few paragraphs here and there to refresh memories of absent characters that will reappear. It's been edited, reedited and pro(?)-edited. Rewritten, added to and cut.  There comes a time when you have to just let it be.  Send that kid out into the world. Even though it's book 1 of 2, it has to fly on it's own merit as a complete stop with one hell of a cliffhanger.  I have spent the morning looking for an assessor to go through the book and while that is happening, I can get a head start on book 2. In fact, I've already started doing that.  Scrivener was my writing app of choice for a long time. But my old 2gb MacbookAir can't support version 3, so instead of using version 2.9 (really slow on my Mac), I have decided to use online writing apps, so I can write from anywhere on any available machine.   I rewrote the

The Haka - New Zealand WW1 Short Film | izakariah

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Crime writers week round up

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It was brilliant. I think they are planning a horror week next.  Some of the days recorded events can be found on YouTube.  Day 2: Of the three events, one 2 were of interest. As I had work the next morning, I watched the replays and really enjoyed "editing with ProWritingAid", although I have edited a book with the program there seems to be more options that I wasn't aware of how to use.  Day 3:  On this day, I only wanted to see: Thriller Writer Panel Discussion (12 PM ET / 5 PM UK). And it was a real blast. Some insightful thoughts and a barrel of laughs.  Day 4: There were 5 events. I wanted to see all of them but missed a couple (lucky there were all recorded and placed online). I did see: How to Market Your Self-Published Crime Novel. I'm not planning of self publishing but still got a few good tips/ideas.  The Interview with Fiona Cummins was great as well. I especially liked (and can relate to) her editor asking if she was writing crime or a horror. She said,

Rakugo

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Late 2019, my wife and I were approached by performance company to translate Rakugo plays for a New York audience. It wasn't as easy as I first thought. You see, Rakugo is a very traditional art form of story telling. There's a man (or woman) sitting on his/her knees, telling a story. Usually funny. Rarely scary. The stories were developed in the Edo period (1603–1868).  The New York performance was cancelled due to Covid-19. It was also cancelled for this year as well. But the students (performers all 55+ years old) had practiced for a year. Most do not speak any English. They did a good job.  I say Rakugo play because this wasn't a traditional performance. There were 8 or 9 people and they acted the story. There were also some songs and dance routines. But they made them funny. It's hard to explain the actual performance as a bit of Japanese ancient culture knowledge is required. They did have a lady standing to one side to introduce the story, with a bit of the backg

Crime Writers Week Day 1

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  We kicked off with Leigh Russell. A lady who first got published in 2009 and now has 25 books out and a contract for four more. She spoke of her experiences with setting/structure/plot and characters. It was an interesting hour, getting her perspectives and a few questions answered. She has 89 more question available at Facebook on the pro writing aid hosted group.  There was a brief mention that Leigh doesn't use an outline. Me neither. I posted this on Twitter, this afternoon I'm a discovery writer. I can't stick to my outline. An outline is a lighted highway from point A to point B. Usually I veer off at the nearest exit. The dark and unlit road offers tastes unexplored. #writer #marketing #writing #writerslife   An astute viewer commented that 'pantsers' (I say, Discovery Writers--it's more eloquent) outline in their head as they go along. I can't say that's wrong. I usually play out a scene in my head while walking the dogs. While the idea is fres

Covers

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Cover make make or break a book. Truth be told, a great cover gets us to glance at the book, pick it up and read the back copy (blurb) to see if it is for us.  Does it sound exciting?  Does the language pop?  Important questions. The same questions sound be asked of your cover. Does it look exciting? Does the image pop? There are some shocking covers out there. Some are mine. LOL. But true.  I always believed a cover should preview what the book is about. Recently, I've discovered that's not exactly true. There are a lot of legacy published titles that have awesome covers that have nothing to do with the story (mostly, not always. For example: T. M. Logan's covers --so far-- match the story).  Let's look at a couple of examples:     The links to these books are below (not aff links). Dancing girls is a beautiful cover.   Keeping in mind that all these book covers are stunning and seem not to relate that much to the story, I decided to pop over to Canva and see what I co

Pen Names

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Hello all, I'm debating on whether or not to us a pen name for my crime novels. You see, way back in 2001 when I made my first sale, I used the name Richard Lee ( http://threeand10.com ). In 2009 a publisher of my second novel, The Last Church convinced me to use my real name. Although I announced the name change to my massive Ning group, MySpace and Twitter, not a lot of people took notice and The Last Church didn't sell as well as it should have with the Richard Lee brand. I had no idea about branding back then. Now, I do. In 2015, I returned to write under the Richard Lee brand and some comments I got were: I wondered what happened to you. Welcome back, Dude.  Missed you. Are you still writing? etc. My books now sell in several languages. Richard Lee wrote horror and science fiction (usually blended together).  Now that I'm writing crime, ( http://www.thriller.nz ) I decided to switch to my real name, and start crime fiction branding (no idea how to do that). But, now I&